Wife and Mother of Four Describes Experience of Possession, Exorcism| National Catholic Register

Teresa Piccola’s harrowing experience of possession and liberation through the solemn rite of exorcism is a cautionary tale that ends with great hope.

Source: Wife and Mother of Four Describes Experience of Possession, Exorcism| National Catholic Register

Writing for the National Catholic Register, Bree Dail goes on to report:

Terese Piccola suffered under so many secrets.
“On the outside, I was the perfect mother, the perfect wife,” she said. “Inside, however, I was broken — and what is worse, I thought I deserved it.”

Speaking exclusively with the Register over the last three months, Piccola related details of her life growing up in an Italian-American home in the suburbs of New York, her marriage and motherhood raising four children, and her activism in the pro-life movement and in her parish — all while quietly enduring years of psychological and emotional torture and unexplained physical ailments.

Her world was turned upside down when extraordinary diabolical phenomena began to manifest themselves as attacks not directly on her, but initially on her children. Her plight ended only after an excruciating year and a half-long battle under the guidance of a clinical psychologist — an expert in possession cases — and through the solemn rite of exorcism.

According to Dail, Ms. Piccola relates how she was sexually abused at a young age, then repeatedly raped when she was thirteen.  Apparently–like too many victims report- Continue reading

The Exorcist: The true story behind the movie…

In what is perhaps one of the most remarkable experiences of its kind in recent religious history, a 14-year-old Mount Rainier boy has been freed by a Catholic priest of possession by the devil, Catholic sources reported yesterday.
Only after between 20 and 30 performances of the ancient ritual of exorcism, here and in St. Louis, was the devil finally cast out of the boy, it was said.

In all except the last of these, the boy broke into a violent tantrum of screaming, cursing and voicing of Latin phrases-a language he had never studied-whenever the priest reached the climactic point of the ritual, “In the name of the Father, the Son and the Holy Ghost, I cast thee (the devil) out.”

In complete devotion to his task, the priest stayed with the boy over a period of two months, during which he said he personally witnessed such manifestations as the bed in which the boy was sleeping suddenly moving across the room.

A Washington Protestant minister had previously reported personally witnessing similar manifestations, including one in which the pallet on which the sleeping boy lay slid slowly across the floor until the boy’s head bumped against a bed, awakening him.

In another instance, reported by the Protestant minister, a heavy armchair in which the boy was sitting with his knees drawn under his chin tilted slowly to one side and fell over, throwing the boy on the floor.

The final rite of exorcism in which the devil was cast from the boy took place in May, it was reported …

A priest here voiced the belief that it was probably the first casting out of the devil through the ritual in at least a century of Catholic activities here and perhaps in the entire history of the church in this area. …[1]

The preceding is an excerpt from a 1949 article published in the Washington Post.  It is said that  William Peter Blatty, who was attending Georgetown University learned of this event and of course we know that years later Blatty wrote the novel that was adapted to be one of the most famous horror films of all time, one that remains today a cult classic.

“The Exorcist” — both the movie and the 1971 novel it’s based on — was written by William Peter Blatty, who first heard about the demonic possession of a 14-year-old boy around 1949, while he was a senior at Georgetown University. Eugene Gallagher, one of his professors and a priest at the Jesuit college, told Blatty, a New York native, about the extraordinary story of the boy who was believed to be in the throes of demonic possession, but had been saved through a series of exorcisms.[2]

Over the years the true identity of the boy has been a highly guarded secret, designed to protect his privacy.  Countless news articles and historical treatises have been written using the pseudonym  Roland or in some cases Robbie Doe.

Photo of someone using Ouija

Hunkeler’s mother thought the strange occurrences were related to the death of an aunt who taught the boy how to use a Ouija board to communicate with spirits. USA Today Network/Sipa USA

It seems that “Robbie” survived the exorcism and grew up to become an engineer and worked at NASA for forty years.  While at NASA he patented a special technology to make space shuttle panels resistant to extreme heat, helping the Apollo missions of the 1960s that put US astronauts on the moon in 1969. [2]

Researchers and would be sleuths managed to track down those with some degree of knowledge about the case and deduced “Robbie’s” true identity.

While exploring the story  for his podcast, The Devil in the Details–JD Sword explains in an article published in the Skeptical Enquirer [3] — found that folks such as investigative journalist Mark Opsasnick, blogger Mike Madonna, and Dr. Sergio A. Rueda had already thoroughly researched the case and cast doubt on many of its claims, as well as having deduced the real identity of Roland Doe.

Sword tell us that Opsasnick spoke to Mt. Rainier resident Dean Landolt, who stated he was “very good friends with Father Hughes, the priest involved in the case. … Father Hughes told me two things: one was that the boy lived in Cottage City, and the other is that he went on to graduate from Gonzaga High and turned out fine.

Opsasnick was able to obtain a list of names of male students that graduated on that year from Gonzaga then he narrowed the list down to only one student who lived in Cottage City and had been born on June 1, 1935: Ronald E. Hunkeler

In his 1999 Strange magazine article, Opsasnick chose not to reveal Ronald’s identity, “for a number of legal reasons” as he explained to me. However, knowing the address made it possible to deduce Ronald’s identity. As author Kyle T. Cobb explained to me, “TW Scott confirmed the address without naming the boy. The address confirmed the last name and parents. The school annuals and interviews with classmates verified the timeline and identity.” In addition, since the publication of the article in Strange, more than just the full twenty-nine-page diary of Father Bishop had become public knowledge. In his book Diabolical Possession and the Case behind the Exorcist, Sergio Rueda interviewed Rev. Schulze on July 25, 1990, and asked him, “Was the name of the family, the Hunkeler family?” to which Schulze replied, “Yes” (Rueda 2018).[3]

Finally we read in the NY Post:

Hunkeler’s female companion confirmed to The Post that he died last year, a month shy of his 86th birthday, after suffering a stroke at his home in Marriottsville, Md., a suburb northwest of Baltimore. He was cremated, she said.

Blatty’s book “The Exorcist” sold more than 13 million copies in the US alone, and the film earned him an Academy Award and a Golden Globe in 1974. It was the first horror movie to be nominated for a Best Picture Oscar.

Universal Studios recently announced that it is planning a rebooted trilogy of the film, with Ellen Burstyn reprising her original role as the mother of the possessed teen, beginning in 2023.[2]

As in many of these cases, those who were not eye witnesses to paranormal events and who want to believe that possession and the Devil himself are naught but figments of our imagination, go out of their way to dismiss and discredit the stories told by those who personally were present and observed phenomena that they could not offer a rational explanation for.  Even I have seen things that I try to find a rational explanation that fit for that which I have experienced.  We would all–even those of us in the ministry–love to say that the devil is just a myth, but that would put us in the position of being culpable, aiding and abetting  in Satan’s grand deception.

May the Peace of the Lord be with Mr. Hunkeler.

 

[1]Priest Frees Mt. Rainier Boy Reported Held in Devil’s Grip By Bill Brinkley Post Reporter Friday, Aug. 20, 1949, Washington Post Archives;https://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-srv/style/longterm/movies/features/dcmovies/exorcism1949.htm

[2] https://nypost.com/2021/12/20/is-the-exorcist-a-true-story-what-happened-to-ronald-hunkeler/

[3]Demoniac: Who Is Roland Doe, the Boy Who Inspired The Exorcist?
by JD Sword From: Volume 45, No. 6 November/December 2021 https://skepticalinquirer.org/2021/10/demoniac-who-is-roland-doe-the-boy-who-inspired-the-exorcist/

Catholic Diocese of Charleston reports rising number of exorcism requests


Father Marreddy Allam

Excerpted from: Catholic Diocese of Charleston reports rising number of exorcism requests |By Rickey Ciapha Dennis Jr.| postandcourier.com


Father Marreddy Allam, who serves as an exorcist for the Roman Catholic Diocese of Charleston, is fielding more requests each year from persons asking the church to help free them from demonic possession. When Allam arrived to South Carolina in 2013, he received 10 requests for exorcisms. By 2018, that jumped to about 45.

This correlates with national reports that the Catholic Church is seeing more clients who want exorcisms. Some dioceses field more than 1,000 requests each year.

The annual uptick is catching the Charleston diocese’s attention — so much so that the diocese held a general training on exorcisms for clergy a few years ago, and named two other clergy members in the diocese as official exorcists.

Continue reading at postandcourier.com

Exorcisms Surge in Concert with Social Decomposition


Excerpted from: Exorcisms Surge in Concert with Social Decomposition By Bill Donohue | November 21, 2018 | CNSNEWS.COM


The Christmas season has just begun, and so has the need for spiritual peace. By any measure, the number of troubled Americans, saddled with personal problems, is staggering. Some are so desperate as to seek ways to purge themselves of demons.

Take the case of Gary Dale Mort. This Muncie, Indiana man recently kicked his wife out of their house and set it on fire. He was shot by police after he flashed what turned out to be a pellet gun; he was not seriously injured. Last year, he slammed his car into Continue reading

People seeking exorcisms rising dramatically: report


Demand for exorcisms in the Catholic Church are on the rise amid a resurgence of interest in occult practice in the United States.

Excerpted from: People seeking exorcisms rising dramatically
By Brandon Showalter
The Christian Post, 24 November 2018


Among the general public, a growing number of Americans believe that demonic possession is real, according to recent data from YouGov and Gallup polling on the subject. Gallup surveys indicate that from 1990 to 2007, the portion of Americans who believed as such grew from 55 to 70 percent.

Father Vincent Lampert, an exorcist for the Archdiocese of Indianapolis, told the Atlantic that he has received 1,700 phone or email requests for exorcisms this year, by far the most he’s ever received in a single year.

Likewise, Father Gary Thomas, who is a Rome-trained exorcist, received “at least a dozen requests a week.”

“Several other priests reported that without support from church staff and volunteers, their exorcism ministries would quickly swallow up their entire weekly schedules,” the Atlantic reported.

The Roman Catholic Church has been training new exorcists in a few cities in the U.S. and other countries. While no official statistics exist, there were only 15 officially trained exorcists in 2011, according to Thomas, who now says there are over 100 today. Continue reading at the Christian Post

The Lutheran Approach to Exorcism


Lutherans are rediscovering their tradition of casting out demons.

Excerpted from: The Lutheran Approach to Exorcism
by Gene Veith
NOVEMBER 20, 2018 | Patheos.com


In my blog post A Lutheran Take on Exorcism and the Demonic, I discussed the work of Dr. Robert Bennett, who has written two books on the subject and who has experience with exorcising demons.  We heard from him at the Rural and Small Town Ministries conference I attended and I wanted to pass on to you what I learned.

In the real-life case that inspired the book and movie The Exorcist, the family of the child who seemed to be possessed by the devil first consulted a Lutheran pastor, who was flummoxed by the levitating furniture, ominous noises, and other weird phenomena he was witnessing, recommended that the Continue reading

How Exorcisms Work


EXORCISTS AND DEMONS CLASH IN A
SUPERNATURAL SHOWDOWN FOR THE FATE OF SOULS

Excerpted from: How Exorcisms Work,
byJoshua Gill |28 October 2018| The Daily Caller


  • While exorcism may seem like the stuff of Halloween horror movies, Christian ministers say battling the demonic is reality.
  • Cases of alleged demonic possession occur to this day, attested to not only by priests but medical professionals as well.
  • The demand for exorcism has spiked in Western countries in recent years, sparking calls for more education on the subject and for the training of more exorcists.

[…]
Major Christian denominations in the U.S., Ireland, and the U.K. have noted a “demonic crisis” in which the need for exorcisms has exceeded the number of available ministers to provide that service. Christian ministers attribute that surge in reported demonic activity to everything from the Continue reading

Demand For Exorcisms On The Rise, Says One American Priest Who Conducts Them | Here & Now

The official exorcist for the Archdiocese of Indianapolis says the ritual isn’t performed the way you might have seen in the movies.

Source: Demand For Exorcisms On The Rise, Says One American Priest Who Conducts Them | Here & Now | 20 April 2018 |WBUR.ORG


Demand for exorcisms is on the rise. But one practitioner says they’re not performed the way you might have seen in the movies. Continue reading

Easy access to black magic and Satanism via Internet increases exorcism demand

Easy access to black magic and Satanism via the Internet has led to an increase in demand for exorcisms, delegates at an annual course on exorcism at the Vatican have heard.

Excerpted from: Easy access to black magic and Satanism via Internet increases exorcism demand 17 April 2018 | by Megan Cornwell , Rose Gamble | The Tablet


More than 250 people from 50 countries arrived in Rome on Monday to attend a week-long course “Exorcism and Prayer of Liberation” at the Catholic Continue reading

Demand for exorcisms is up, so Vatican is holding conference

Excerpted from: Demand for exorcisms is up, so Vatican is holding conference

By:, USA TODAY Published 2:12 p.m. ET Feb. 23, 2018


The Vatican hopes to step up its game against demon possessions with a week-long conference to address a threefold increase in demand or exorcists.

The church is particularly alarmed over the uneven skills of some of its current exorcists and worried about priests who are no longer willing to learn the techniques.

… Friar Beningo Palilla, told Vatican Radio there are some 500,000 cases requiring exorcism in Italy each year.

While many of the cases are not actually related to demonic possession, but to spiritual or psychological problems, he conceded, they nonetheless must be investigated.

“We priests, very often, do not know how to deal with the concrete cases presented to us: in the preparation for the priesthood, we do not talk about these things,” he said.

Palilla is particularly concerned about some do-it-yourselfers within the priesthood.

“A self-taught exorcist certainly meets errors,” he said. “I will say more: it would also take a period of apprenticeship, as happens for many professionals.”

Read this in its entirety at: Demand for exorcisms is up, so Vatican is holding conference